[uClinux-dev] booting linux from flash.

Phil Wilshire philwil at earthlink.net
Thu Aug 22 04:05:39 EDT 2002


HI Sekhar

Just a suggestion....

Store your "configuration" in a flash partition.
If your bootloader can parse text then the data can be 
in some kind of text format.

The Arcturus Networks bootloader has a nice feature where
it can store boot environment variables in flash which are
read /writeable from both bootloader and the OS.

regards
  Phil Wilshire
 
"Nori, Soma Sekhar" wrote:
> 
> Suppose I have a configuration file for the bootloader, which has to be read
> by the bootloader,
> I want to be able to modify the configuration file from the OS so that next
> time I boot the
> new configuration takes effect. How do I do this if the config file cannot
> be accessed in
> some text editor(like vi)
> 
> -Sekhar
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ken Treis [mailto:ken at reasonability.net]
> Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2002 1:14 PM
> To: uclinux-dev at uclinux.org
> Subject: Re: [uClinux-dev] booting linux from flash.
> 
> Nori, Soma Sekhar wrote:
> 
> >Hi Phil,
> >The partition might be visible thro the MTD, but since the bootloader
> >is stored using some format which is not necessarly know to linux, how
> >do read the bootloader config files etc after the OS comes up?
> >the question is only conceptual and I might be making a mistake in
> thinking.
> >
> Remember that a bootloader is the first program that runs when a board
> boots.  Its responsibility is simply to create an environment for the
> operating system to run in and launch the operating system.  Because
> there is no OS under the bootloader, no OS features (like filesystems)
> are available to the bootloader.  It has to do everything itself.  We
> application programers tend to take things like filesystems and
> networking layers for granted, but they simply aren't present for a
> bootloader to use.
> 
> Another way of thinking about this is that the bootloader is just
> compiled code.  The compiled code is therefore the only thing that you
> can access, view, erase, or overwrite after you've booted.  As Phil W.
> mentioned, you can use MTD to do this.  We use MTD to install updated
> bootloaders on our existing systems.
> 
> What is your goal in accessing the bootloader after you've booted?  If
> you tell us more of what you're trying to do, we might be better able to
> help you find a workable solution.
> 
> --
> Ken Treis
> ken at reasonability.net
> 
> This message resent by the uclinux-dev at uclinux.org list server
> http://www.uClinux.org/
> This message resent by the uclinux-dev at uclinux.org list server http://www.uClinux.org/

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